Ancient Egypt

         

Page by Anneke Bart





Kings and Queens

4th dynasty
Seneferu, Khufu, Khafre, Menkaure, Djedefre, etc.

11th dynasty
Kings named Mentuhotep and Intef

12th dynasty
Amenemhet I - IV,
Senusret I-III


18th dynasty
Amenhotep I-IV,
Tuthmosis I-IV, Akhenaten, Tutankhamen, Aye, Horemheb, etc.


19th dynasty
Sety I-II, Ramesses I-II, Merenptah, Amenmesses, Tawosret.

20th dynasty

Sethnakht, Ramesses III
Ramesses IV - XI




Cleopatra VII Philopator

Queens (D1-6)- Old Kingdom
Queens (D11-13) Middle Kingd.
Queens (D16-20)- New Kingdom
Queens (D21-29)- Late Period




Officials, Priesthood etc.
Viziers (New Kingdom)
High Priests of Amun
God's Wives of Amun
High Priests of Ptah
Viceroys of Nubia
Who's who of New Kingdom


Amarna Period
Akhenaten
Queen Nefertiti
inscriptions Queen Nefertiti.
Queen Kiya

Smenkhare
Tutankhamen
Tombs at Amarna
Houses at Amarna

Tombs:
Valley of the Kings,
Valley of the Queens
Theban Tombs,
Tombs at Abydos
Tombs at El Kab
Tombs in Aswan
Early dynastic Saqqara
New Kingdom Saqqara
The Unis Cemetary

Mastabas at the Giza Plateau
Giza Mastabas 1000 cemetary
Giza Mastaba 2000 cemetary
Giza Mataba 2300 cemetary
Giza Mastaba 4000 cemetary
Giza Mastaba 5000 cemetary
Giza Mastaba 6000 cemetary
Giza Mastaba 7000 cemetary

Mummy Caches
Tomb DB320
Tomb KV35


Tuthmosis III (Menkheperre)





Horus name: Kanakht Khaemwaset
Nebty name: Wahnesyt
Golden Falcon name: Djeserkhau Sekhempehti
Prenomen: Menkheperre
Nomen: Thutmose

Family background:

Tuthmosis III was the son of Thutmosis II (Akheperenre) and Queen Isis.






Queen Isis was not a high ranking woman at court. She was given the title of Great King’s Wife by her son, and the title of God's Wife after her death. Isis is known from a beautiful statue.
Isis is also depicted on a pillar in the tomb of her son Tuthmosis III (see below). She is shown standing behind him in a papyrus boat. She is identified as the mother of the King, Isis. Her name is interestingly enough not written in a cartouche.
Right below this scene is another showing Tuthmosis with his wives and a daughter. Next to that is a scene showing Isis in the form of a tree suckling the young Tuthmosis. In this case there is a play on names and the goddess Isis seems to be linked with Queen Isis the mother of the King.






Tuthmosis had a half-sister named Neferure. She was the daughter of Tuthmosis' step-mother and co-regent.

Tuthmosis III had quite few wives:
  • Merytre  (-Hatshepsut), King’s Great Wife, King’s Mother. She was the daughter of the Divine Adoratrix Huy. Many of her representations were reused by her daughter in law Tiaa. Her disgrace under her grandson is suggested  by the apparent non-use of her tomb in the Valley of the Kings (KV 42). Titles: Hereditary Princess (iryt-p`t), Sole One, Great of Praises (wrt-hzwt-w’tit), King’s Mother (mwt-niswt), Lady of The Two Lands (nbt-t3wy), King’s Wife (hmt-nisw), Great King’s Wife (hmt-niswt-wrt), God’s Wife (hmt-ntr), God’s Hand (djrt-ntr)
  • Satiah  Great Wife, King’s Wife and King’s Great Wife. She was the daughter of the royal nurse Ipu. Titles: King’s Wife (hmt-nisw), Great King’s Wife (hmt-niswt-wrt), God’s Wife (hmt-ntr).
  • Nebtu  King’s Wife. Represented in her husband’s tomb. Titles: King’s Wife (hmt-nisw)
  • Neferure  King’s Daughter, Great Wife and King’s Great Wife. She was the daughter of Hatshepsut and Thutmosis II. She was possibly married to Thutmosis III (her half brother). She may have been buried in the Wadi Qubbet el Qurud in Thebes.  Titles: King’s Daughter (s3t-niswt), God’s Wife (hmt-ntr),
    Possibly: Great King’s Wife (hmt-niswt-wrt), Mistress of Upper and Lower Egypt (hnwt-Shm’w T3-mhw).
  • Menwi, Merti and Menhet. King’s Wives. Probably daughters of a Syrian chieftain. They shared a tomb in Thebes which is known for the treasures it contained. Titles: King’s Wife (hmt-nisw)
  • Nebsemi: Queen mentioned on a fragment of a statue found in the funerary temple of Tuthmosis III. She may have been one of his minor wives. Titles: King’s Wife (hmt-nisw), King’s Wife, his beloved (hmt-nisw meryt.f)


At the top: Tuthmosis and his mother Isis.
Below: Tuthmosis followed by Queens Merytre, Sitiah, Nebtu and his daughter Nefertari.

Tuthmosis had 4 known sons:
  • Amenhotep (II) followed his father on the throne at age 18. Depicted as prince in the tomb of Min, Mayor of Thinis (TT 109)
  • Amenemhat held the title of Eldest King’s Son, he was appointed Overseer of Cattle. (mentioned at Karnak - south side of Festival Hall - in yr 24). Dorman has suggested that Amenemhat was a son of Neferure, but there is no conclusive evidence for the identity of his mother.
  • Siamun. Named upon statuette CG 1112
  • Menkheperre. Depicted upon British Museum statuette EA I 280, where he leads two princesses called Meryetamun and Isis
(Some of this information comes from: Crown Prince Djhutmose and the Royal Sons of the Eighteenth Dynasty by Aidan Dodson, The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, Vol. 76. (1990), pp. 87-96.)

Daughters: Beketamen, Nefertiry, Nebetiunet, Merytamen, Iset





Temples
Ptah Temple at Karnak

Djeser-Akhet. The temple of Amen built at Deir el Bahari directly to the south of Hatshepsut’s temple Djeser Djeseru. Djeser Akhet was built on a raised terrace and approached by a broad causeway and ramp. It was originally similar in design to the temple of Hatshepsut. It was built on higher ground and must have dominated Hatshepsut’s temple as it’s architects no doubt intended. [Tyldesley]

Hall of Annals at Karnak. Thutmosis completely dismanteled the Chapelle Rouge built under the direction of Hatshepsut. Hatshepsut’s image where attacked on the blocks from the Chapelle Rouge. The erasures seem rather random and incomplete. Either the attack was stopped, or more likely, the erasure did not take place until after the Chapelle Rouge had been dismanteled and the blocks had been put in storage. [Tyldesley]



The following photographs are form Jon Bodsworth's site  http://www.egyptarchive.co.uk/
I have included some of his descriptions of the scenes as they explain the scenes,

 

Two fragments of fallen obelisks bearing the cartouche of Tuthmosis III.
The obelisk on the right was originally erected by Hatshepsut.


    

"The obelisk of Hatshepsut viewed from beside the Sanctuary with the Hall of Records of Tuthmose III in between." (J.B.)
"A pillar in Tuthmose III's Hall of Records. Made of granite it bears a Paprus plant symbol of Lower Egypt." (J.B.)
"The so-called Annals of Tuthmoses III show him standing before offerings made after foriegn campaigns. The offerings include gold bracelets, precious stones and alabaster jars filled with ungents." (J.B.)

  

"The two pillars erected by Tuthmose III.
They represent Lower Egypt on the left with a Papyrus and Upper Egypt on the right with a Lotus." (J.B.)
"Tuthmoses III holding a Hedj Club and a Sekhem Scepter stands before two obelisks which he had erected at Karnak." (J.B.)

     

"A statue probably of Tuthmose III near the 6th Pylon." (J.B.)
"Inside Tuthmose III's Great Festival Temple which lies beyond an area of Middle Kingdom ruins. The columns are unique with an inverted calyx capital in the form of a tent pole." (J.B.)
"A close up of one of the unusal column capitals in Tuthmoses III's Great Festival Temple. Original colour shows some of the decoration." (J.B.)

        

"Many different plants, animals and birds are represented in the reliefs in Tuthmose III 'Botanical Garden'." (J.B.)

  

Even more scenes from the 'Botanical Garden'.
The line drawings were added (by J.B.) to bring out the detail in these scenes.
See this site for more great photographs of the 'Botanical Garden':
See also this site by Nofret (Carla):

http://www.egypt-kemet.com/index.php?id=botanicgarden_01

   

South facade of the 7th Pylon. Tuthmose III  is shown twice standing above vanquished enemies, which name conquered cities appearing in the text.
A close up of Queen Hatshepsut's 'Red Chapel' shows that the  monument also bears the cartouche of Tuthmose III.




Tombs from the time of Tuthmosis III

KV 20 - Tuthmosis I and Hatshepsut, 18th dynasty. Perhaps the eldest royal tomb in the King's Valley.
KV 20 had been designed and prepared by the architect Ineni for Thutmosis I. Hatshepsut later extended the tomb to accommodate a double burial. The body of Thutmes I was later moved to KV 38, during the reign of Thutmes III. Hatshepsut's burial was left in KV 20.
http://www.thebanmappingproject.com/sites/browse_tomb_834.html

KV 33 - [...], 18th dynasty. Time of Tuthmosis III.

KV 34 - Tuthmosis III, 18th dynasty.
http://www.thebanmappingproject.com/sites/browse_tomb_848.html

KV 37
- [...], 18th dynasty. Possibly a royal tomb dating to the time of Tuthmosis III.

KV 38 - Tuthmosis I, 18th dynasty. Possibly constructed during the reign of Tuthmosis III for the reburial of Tuthmosis I.
http://www.thebanmappingproject.com/sites/browse_tomb_852.html

KV 42 - Merytre-Hatshepsut, wife of Tuthmosis III, 18th dynasty. KV 42 may have been reused by Sennefer, mayor of Thebes, Senetnay, his wife, and Baketra, the "king's adornment," during the reign of Amenhetep II
http://www.thebanmappingproject.com/sites/browse_tomb_856.html

KV 59 - [...],  18th dynasty. Possibly time of Tuthmosis III.

In Thebes many of the courtiers from the time Tuthmosis were buried. Here is a selected list giving some idea of the wide range of officials buried in the Theban Necropolis during this time. I have left out some of the lower ranking overseers and workers, because the list becomes too long. See also: Theban Tombs Page.
TT11. Djehuty, Overseer of the treasury, temp Hatshepsut - Tuthmosis III
TT20. Mentuherkhepshef, Fan-bearer, Mayor of Qusiya (Aphroditopolis)
TT22. Wah, cupbearer of the king (Royal Butler)
TT24. Nebamun, steward of the king's wife Nebtu.
TT42. Amenmose, Captain of troops, Eyes of the King in the Two Lands of the Retenu, Temp Tuthmosis III - Amenhotep II
TT61. User,Governor of the town and Vizier.
TT62. Amenemwaskhet, Overseer of the Cabinet.
TT78. Horemheb, Scribe of recruits, Temp. Tuthmosis III - Amenhotep III. Tutor of Princess Amenmipet. Master of the Horse.
TT79. Menkheper(raseneb), Overseer of the granary, wab-priest in the mortuary temple of Tuthmosis III, Temp. Tuthmosis III - Amenhotep II
TT81. Ineni, Overseer of the granary in the Amun domain, Temp. Amenhotep I - Tuthmosis III
TT82. Amenemhat, Scribe,Accountant of grain of Amun, Steward of the Vizier.
TT83. Amenthu called Ahmose, Governor of Town and Vizier.
TT84. Amunedjeh, First herald of the king, Overseer of the gate.
TT85. Amenemheb called Mahu , Commander of soldiers, Temp. Tuthmosis III - Amenhotep II
TT86. Menkheperraseneb
, High priest of Amun, Temp. Tuthmosis III High Priest of Amun, Superintendent of the Gold and silver treasuries, Chief of the Overseers of Craftsmen
TT87. Minnakht, Overseer of the granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt, Overseer of horses of the Lord of the Two Lands, Royal scribe.
TT
88. Pehsukher called Tjenenu, Lieutenant of the King, Standard-bearer of Pharaoh, Temp. Tuthmosis  III - Amenhotep II
TT98. Kaemheribsen, Third prophet of Amun, Temp. Tuthmosis III - Amenhotep II (?)
TT99. Sennefer(i), treasurer, Overseer of Sealbearers.
TT100. Rekhmira, vizier, Temp. Tuthmosis III - Amenhotep II
TT109. Min, mayor of Tjeny (Thinis), Overseer of the prophets of Onuris, Tutor of Amenhotep II.
TT110. Djehuty, cupbearer of the king, herald of the king,Temp. Hatshepsut - Tuthmosis III
TT112. Menkheperraseneb, High priest of Amun.
TT121. Ahmose
, first lector-priest of Amun. First Lector Priest of Amun, followed subsequently by Second Prophet of Amun-Ra in the great temple at Karnak (i.e., no. 2 high priest), and God's Father, Beloved of the God (a mid-level grade of priest). On his funerary cones, Ahmose also bears the title First Prophet in Henqet-ankh, i.e., high priest in the mortuary temple of King Thutmose III.
TT131. User or Useramen, vizier, Temp. Tuthmosis III The aged Vizier Amethu (User's father) is shown with chamberlain, courtiers and User as a scribe before Tuthmosis III, and a text of the installation of User as co-vizier.
TT146. Nebamun, overseer of the granary of Amun, Counter of grain, iny of the God's Wife.
TT154. Tati, Cupbearer.
TT155. Intef, Great herald of the king, Temp. Hatshepsut -Tuthmosis III
TT172. Mentiywy, Royal Butler, child of the nursery, Temp. Tuthmosis III - Amenhotep II (?)
TT200. Dedi, Governor of the deserts on the wet of Thebes, Head of the troops of Pharaoh, Temp. Tuthmosis III- Amenhotep II
TT205. Thutmose, Royal Butler, Temp. Tuthmosis III (?) - Amenhotep II (?)
TT224. Ahmose Humay, Overseer of the estate of the God's Wife, Overseer of the double granaries of the God's Wife Ahmose-Nefertary Temp. Tuthmosis III - Hatshepsut
TT225. name unknown, High priest of Hathor.
TT239. Penhat, Overseer for all the Northern Lands, Temp. Tuthmosis III - Amenhotep II (?)
TT241. Ahmose, Scribe of divine writings, Child of the nursery, Head of the mysteries in the House of the morning.
TT342. Thutmose, Hereditary prince, Herald of the king.
TT343. Benia called Paheqamen, Overseer of works, child of the nursery, early 18th Dynasty Possibly Tuthmosis III.
C11. Nebseny, Overseer of goldsmiths of Amun, Overseer of all works silver and gold.
D1. Nehy, Viceroy of Nubia, Governor of the South Lands.






Important Court Officials




Most of the information below comes from Cline and O'Connor's Thutmose III, A new Biography. More specifically from: Administration in the reign of Thutmose III - by Betsy Bryan (pg 69 - 122). For more detail one should consult this text.

It seems impossible to separate Tutmosis' reign from that of Hatshepsut. Tuthmosis was the sole ruler for the first ca 5 -7 years with Hatshepsut no doubt playing an influential role in the background. Between year 5 and year 7 Hatshepsut takes on pharaonic titles and changes from regent to co-regent. Hatshepsut is effectively co-King of Egypt  until year 22 of Thutmosis' reign. I have included some of these early court officials.


Viziers:

Amethu, called Ahmose,
First of the Northern Viziers during the coregency period. Not much is known about Amethu. He held the office of Vizieer until ca. Year 5 when he was succeeded by Useramen. Amethu was buried in TT83 and we learn something about his immediate family from the inscriptions. His wife was named Ta-amethu. They had several children,most of whom rose to prominent positions at Tuthmosis’ court. His son Useramen also served as Vizier, and it is possible that the northern vizier Neferweben was also a son of Amethu.. Amenhotep served as Overseer of the Magazine of Amun,, Akheperkare served as Priest of Monthu, and Amenmose (?) was a scribe in the treasury of Amen.

Useramen (sometimes called User) became vizier in ca year 5 and served until year 33 or 34 when he was secceeded by his nephew Rekhmire. Hence a large part of Useramen’s tenure took place during the reign of Hatshepsut. Useramen had two tomb in the Theban Necropolis: TT 61 and TT131. The two tombs have complementary decorations. Useramen was a son of Amenthu and Ta-Amenthu.  According to inscriptions in one of his tombs, Useramun served as deputy Vizier when his father Amenthu got old.
Useramun was married to Thuiu and had several children. Men carrying the title “son” include Sa-Menkhet, scribe of the seal of the god, Merimaat,priest and scribe of Amun, Mery, priest of Amun in Djeser Djeseru, Manenemhet, wab priest of Amun, and Userhet (no title for the latter). Ladies with the title of daughter include: two Ahmoses, Amenemwhesket, Amenemheb, Baket, Henut and Seniseneb.

Rekhmire, Mayor and Vizier.
Rekhmire held office in or before year 34 when he is known to have been responsible for grain deliveries. Rekhmire was the grandson of Amethu and the nephew of Useramun. Rekhmire was the son of a wab priest of Amun named Neferweben. It is possible that his father is identical to the northern vizier Neferweben, but this identification is not certain. Rekhmire was buried in TT100, which is quite famous for the representations of the officie of vizier. The texts include the “Duties of the Vizier” and the “Installation of Vizier” texts.
On the long, eastern wall of the chapel we first find paintings of Rekhmire's sons, including Menkeperreseneb, Amenophis and Senusert, in the presence of Rekhmire and his wife Meryt.  His sons are likely named Menkeperreseneb, Amenhotep, Senusert, Mery, Neferweben and possibly Baki.

Neferweben, Governor of the Town and Vizier[Griffith Inst.] Married to Bet.
Neferweben was Vizier of the North and is known from a statue in the temple of Ptah. Two canopic jars belonging to Neferweben have been identified. We do not know however where he was buried.

Ptahmose
This northern vizier is known from a statue from the funerary temple of Tuthmosis III. A false door, a palette and a cubit rod are displayed in Leiden, the Louvre and Leiden respectively. It’s generally assumed that Ptahmose was buried in Saqqara, but his tomb has not been identified.

Viceroy of Nubia and overseers of foreign lands:
Amenmose, Captain of troops, Eyes of the King in the Two Lands of the Retenu, Served Tuthmosis III and Amenhotep II; Wife: Henuttaui. TT42

Penhat, Overseer for all the Northern Lands, Served Tuthmosis III and Amenhotep II? Wife: Hetepi. TT239

Djehuti, Overseer of northern foreign countries, etc., son of Amenmosi and Isoneb. [Griffith Inst.]

Inebni (or Ini(anti) ) Viceroy of Kush.
Believed by some to be the Viceroy during the early years. (Hibachi f.i.)

Amenemnekhu – Viceroy of Kush
Known to be in office in year 18

Nehi, Viceroy of Kush (second half of reign), Governor of the South Lands TT - D1
Evidence shows he was in office in years 23 and 25.


Stewards and Palace Officials
Senenmut
Chief Steward to Queen Hatshepsut. Not an individual serving Tuthmosis III, but Senenmut would have been an individual whom Tuthmosis would have known very well growing up.

Wadjet-Renpet, Chief Steward
Served during the co-regency of Hatshepsut and Tuthmosis. Is known to have corresponded with the overseer of the seal Ty.

Kenna – Chief Steward of the King.
Likely followed Wadjet-Renpet in office. Shown in an inscription behind the overseer of the seal Senneferi.

Nebamun, steward of the king's wife Nebtu.
Son of Tetires and Ipu. Married to the lady Resti. Buried in TT24

Kenamun –Royal Butler, Mayor of Memphis
Is known to have served as royal butler. Buried in an unknown tomb in Thebes.

Neferperet – Royal Butler clean of hands, child of the kap.
Known from astatue from Karnak to have served Tuthmosis on a campaign to retenu. The statue lists some of his rewards. He showed both the Tuthmosis and Queen Merytre on his stelaphorous statue.

Montu-iywy, Royal Butler, child of the nursery,
Son of the Lady Hepu. Buried in Thebes in TT172. Accompanied Tuthmosis III to the Levant and crossed the Euphrates. Started his career as a servant of the royal apartments (ipt nsw). May have become a royal butler during the reign of Amenhotep II, but is known to have served Tuthmosis III.

Djehuty, royal butler, royal herald,
Son of Pesediri and Keku;   Wife: Bakt TT110

Tati, Royal Butler
Tentatively dated to the time of Tuthmosis III. Buried in TT154

Wah, Royal Butler, Overseer of the Ruyt
Buried in TT22

Iamnedjeh – First Royal Herald, Controller of the Works, Overseer of the Granaries and Overseer of the Ruyt.

Intef - Royal Herald, Wearer of the Royal Seal, Sole Companion, Favorite of the Good God.
A stela of Intef lists the duties of a royal heralds, and they include the
following: manage formalities and ceremonies of the court and palace. ; Communicate messages of people and affairs of the land to the King. ; Manager of the judgement
hall, or general administrative offices of the Pharaoh. [Breasted]
Intef was buried in TT155. In the tomb his brother Ahmose and son Teti are mentioned.

Thutmose, Royal Herald, Hereditary Prince
Son of the lady Tabenert, married to Tepihu. Buried in TT342

Si-Bastet – Royal Barber
Si-Bastet dedicated a statue in year 27. On the statue he mentions going on a campaign with Pharaoh Tuthmosis III. The statue records how a slave Amen-iywy was made barber at the temple of Bubastis and married a blind niece of Si-Bastet.. A petition was made to ensure access to the palace.




Other Government Officials
 
Treasury Officials
Ahmose called Pennekhbet - Overseer of the Seal
This official is mainly known as an army official whose career goes back all the way to the reign of Ahmose and as a tutor of the princess Neferure. Ahmose called Pennekhbet also held the title of Overseer of the seal and may have served as treasurer for a short time.

Senenmut
This well-known courtier held the title of Overseer of the Seal as well as many others. He was also overseer of the gold and silver houses. Senenmut may have held this position only for as short time under Tuthmosis and into the regency of Hatshepsut.

Nehesy
In year 9 of Tuthmosis (and hence fairly soon after Hatshepsut takes on pharaonic titles) Nehesy is Overseer of the Seal. Nehesy is known to have been responsible for the organization of the expedition to Punt. Nehesy’s tomb was discovered in Saqqara by Alain Zivie.

Ty, Chief treasurer
Ty started as Overseer of the Seal during the coregency of Hatshepsut. Ty was in office at least from year 12 to year 25. Ty is known from inscriptions from years 12 and 18 referring to Nubian campaigns of Hatshepsut. In year 25 Ty left a lengthy inscription inn the Sinai praising Tuthmosis III.

Sennefer(i), Treasurer and Mayor of Thebes
Senneferi was Overseer of the seal in the reign of Thutmose III. He was the owner of TT
99. He is also known from a statue in the British museum. His wife Taiamu is depicted in TT99. Senneferi was the son of Haydjehuty - overseer of the bureau of Watet-Hor – and Satdjehuty – a royal ornament. Senneferi held several offices . He was superior of the overseers of the storehouses, overseer of the seal, mayor, overseer of several deities including Sobek and Anubis, chief of mayors, overseer of the fields of Amun, mayor of Akhmim and overseer of the Priests of Min in Coptos. In his tomb Senneferi is shown making a trip to Byblos in Lebanon to bring back Cedar trees.

Min Overseer of the Seal, great chief in Upper Egypt and judge in Lower Egypt
Overseer of the Seal during the latter years of Tuthmosis III. His son Sobekhotep would later hold the same office under Tuthmosis IV. Min must have been buried in Thebes as funerary cones were found there, but the location of his tomb is at present unknown.

Lower ranking positions:

Amenhotep, deputy treasurer, Continued to serve under Amenhotep II.Parents: Ahmose (Overseer of the pool (?) of the king of Lower Egypt, Scribe) and Neh. TT C3:This tomb is the resting place of Sennefer's (TT99) daughter Renena and her husband Amenhotep. ('deputy of the overseer of seal-bearers)

Djehuty, overseer of the treasury, overseer of the silver houses, overseer of the gold houses
Son of the Lady Dediu. Djehuty was buried in TT11. He is known to have served both Hatshepsut and Tuthmosis III.

Benermerut - overseer of the silver houses, overseer of the gold houses
Served during the sole rule of Tuthmosis III. Benermerut is known to have donated land on behalf of the Mnevis bull  in year 45 in Heliopolis. A statue of Benermerut from Thebes shows him with the King’s Daughter Meryetamun. He may have been buried in the North because his tomb is not known in Thebes.


Granary Officials

Minnakht, Overseer of the two granaries and of the accounts of grain of Upper and Lower Egypt, Overseer of horses of the Lord of the Two Lands, Royal scribe, etc.
Minnakht was the son of the judge Sendjehuty. A Sen-djehuty is depicted in TT294 and this official was also an overseer of the granary. It is not clear if this man is identical to Minnakht’s father. Minnakht’s son Menkheperreseneb later served as Overseer of the granary, as well as wab-priest in the mortuary temple of Tuthmosis III. Minnakht was buried in TT87. We also know several of Minnakht’s subordinates. A scribe namedHepu served Minnakht in his earlier years, while the scribe Wesy is attested in year 33-34.
A man named Hatit was the corn measurer of Minnakht.

Tjenuna - Overseer of the two granaries of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Tjenuna served as overseer in the third decade of the reign of Tuthmosis. Hence he is known to have overlapped with Minnakht. He may be identical to a Tjenuna who was “of the house of the divine adoratrice”. He’s likely not to be identified with the chief steward and steward of Amun by the same name who served under Tuthmosis IV.

Iamunedjeh – First royal herald, Overseer of the ruyt, royal scribe, counter of cattle and fowl, overseer of granaries who counts the taxes of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Iamunedjeh is known to have been on campaign in Syria with Tuthmosis III in year 33, and he likely served as overseer of the granary later, during the end of the reign. He may have held the porition at the same time as Minnakht’s son Menkheperreseneb.

Menkheper(raseneb), Overseer of the Granary of the Lord of the Two Lands, Wab priest in the mortuary temple of Tuthmosis III.
Son of Minnakht. Menkheperreseneb served as Overseer of the granary during the latter years of Tuthmosis III’s reign and held the position into the reign of Amenhotep II.

Lower ranking officials:

Amenemhat, overseer of the granaries of bread,
Wife: Henutiri. TT123. Amenemhet may have worked with Minnakht.

Nebamun Superintendent of the grain stores under Thutmose III (Abbott Papyrus)

Neferhotep, Overseer of the granary, Continued to serve under Amenhotep II. TT A5


Mayors, etc

Humay (maybe read Hemy), Mayor of Memphis. [Griffith Inst.]
Known from a statue in the Louvre.

Kenamun – Mayor of Mennefer (Memphis), Royal Butler, Overseer of the Granary.
Kenamun was buried in Thebes (funerary cone)

Pahery – Mayor of Nekhen and Iunyt, scribe of accounting, royalnurse for Prince Wadjmose (son of Tuthmosis I). Buried in Nekhen (El-Kab).

Mentuherkhepshef, Fan-bearer, Mayor of Qusiya (Aphroditopolis), Mother: Taysent. TT20

Satepihu - mayor of Tjeny (Thinis)
Satepihu was in office during the coregency of Hatshepsut and Tuthmosis III.

Intef- Herald, mayor of Tjeny (Thinis), chief of all the Oasis.

Min, mayor of Tjeny (Thinis), Overseer of the prophets of Onuris. Overseer of the priests of Osiris.
Son of the lady Say.   Sons: Senty called Iuty, and Sebekmose. Min is shown teaching prince Amenhotep how to shoot, and with the prince on his lap. TT109

Iamnefer- Mayor of Nefrusy, wab priest and scribe of divine offerings of Thoth, high priest of Thoth.
Iamnefer was the son of Pa-ahawty who was also mayor of Nefrusy. Iamnefer particiapated in in atleast one of the Sed festivals. On a statue from Karnak, Iamnefer is shown with  the prince Aakheperenreseneb. Iamnefer’s son Suemniwet accompanied Tuthmosis to Syria and would later become a royal butler during the reign of Amenhotep II.

Sennefer(i), Treasurer and Mayor of Thebes (continued from the reign of Hatshepsut). 'Overseer of sealbearers' in the reign of Thutmose III, owner of Theban Tomb 99. (Statue in British Museum). His wife Taiamu is depicted in TT99. Father: Haydjehuty, "overseer of the bureau of Watet-Hor", Mother: Zatdjehuty "royal ornament"
Ahmose, Mayor of Shat, etc., son of Ahmosi and Teti


Other:

Dedi
,
Governor of the deserts on the west of Thebes, Head of the troops of Pharaoh, Served Tuthmosis III and Amenhotep II; Wife: Tuy TT200

Ineni, Architect, overseer of the granary in the Amun domain; served under Amenhotep I - Tuthmosis III
Family statues are 240-244cm high and show (left to right) Ineni's wife Thuau, Ineni, Ineni's father - Ineni, and Ineni's sister Aahhotep. (The walls on either side of the statues are scenes of Ineni's relations) TT81

May
, harbour master in Thebes, TT130



Priesthood:


Hapuseneb -  High Priest of Amun, Overseer of the hm-priests of Upper and Lower Egypt.
Served during the coregency of Hatshepsut and Tuthmosis III. Probably predeceased Hatshepsut. Buried in TT 67. Hapuseneb was the son of the third lector priest of Amun Hepu and the royal ornament Ahhotep. Hapuseneb was married to the lady Amenhotep and is known to have had several children. His daughter Seniseneb was a divine adoratrix of Amun and was married to the Second priest of Amun Puyemre.

Menkheperraseneb, High priest of Amun
Theban Tomb 112. Son of the King’s Nurse Ta-iunet and the charioteer of his majesty Hepu. His grand-mother is called Nebetta and may be identical to the mother of the Menkheperreseneb of Tomb 86. But the name is a rather common name at the time. On the other hand, the tomb stylistically seems to date to an earlier part of the reign.

Menkheperreseneb  High Priest of Amen [Griffith Inst.] Superintendent of the Gold and silver treasuries, Chief of the Overseers of Craftsmen i.e. High Priest of Ptah.
Buried in TT 86. Son of the sister of nursing of the king Nebetta. The exact order and relationship of the two Menkheperresenebs is not clear. The name of Djeser Akhet appears in TT86 and this may suggest a later date (ca yr 44). Mention of certain areas in Syria point to  a possible date between year 33 and 44.

Sennefer – Greatest of Seers in Heliopolis (HP of Ra), Greatest Controller of Craftsmen (HP of Ptah).
This High Priest is known from the family tomb of his daughter Sherit-Re and her husband Nebnakht –hm priest of Heryshef – from Sedment. Sherit-Re, Nebnakht and their son Amenmose were buried in Sedment.

Ken – High priest of Mut, Mistress of Isheru
Ken was buried in TT59. His brothers Kenamun and Wesy were resp. the overseer of gold workers and sculptors and the overseer of the granary. Likely also related to the Temple of Mut. Ken was the son of an overseer of the granary and the royal ornament Tuiu. His wife was named Meryt.

Nebwawi  - High Priest of Osiris in Abydos. His position lasted all the way into the co-regency with Amenhotep II.  Also served as Steward of the temple of Osiris and hm-priest of Heket.

Minmose (II): First Prophet of Osiris. Son of Minmose I [Griffith Inst.]
Possibly during the earlier part of the reign??

Ahmose, first lector-priest of Amun, First Prophet in Henqet-ankh
"Hereditary Prince and Count, Confidant of the King in the Council Chamber, Great Offspring (of the king) in the Palace, Greatest of His Companions,  Master of the Secret of the Great Throne, Seal-bearer of the King of Lower Egypt (i.e., 'Chancellor'). First Lector Priest of Amun, followed subsequently by Second Prophet of Amun-Ra in the great temple at Karnak (i.e., no. 2 high priest), and God's Father, Beloved of the God (a mid-level grade of priest). On his funerary cones, Ahmose also bears the title First Prophet in Henqet-ankh, i.e., high priest in the mortuary temple of King Thutmose III  Possibly "Child of the Nursery of Queen Meritamun" (wife of Amenhotep I, c. 1551-1524). Father of Roy.

Puyemre, Second Prophet of Amen (continued from the reign of Hatshepsut)

Kaemheribsen, third priest of Amun, time of Tuthmosis III - Amenhotep II (?) TT98

Mahu, Second prophet of Amun



Other members of the priesthood and administrators

Ahmose Humay, Overseer of the estates of the God’s Wife, Overseer of the granaries of the God’s Wife Ahmose Nefertari TT224 Son of Senusert and Taidy;  Wife: Nub (Royal concubine)

Ahmose, Scribe of divine writings, Child of the nursery, Head of the mysteries in the House of the morning, Wife: Ahmose. TT241

Amenemhab, Overseer of cattle of Amun-Re, Steward of Menkheperre (Tuthmosis III), etc., lower part, with wife Nedjemet

Amenmose, overseer of cattle of Amun, overseer of production-area of Amun, TT251

Amenhotep, Overseer of works in the temple of Osiris, Director of works in the temple of Isis, Overseer of prophets of Onuris, etc.,

Amenemhat, Amun temple administrator , TT53

Djehuti , Overseer of the treasury of Montu, etc. (probably TT 11), on statue dedicated by son Mentunakht; served Hatshepsut and Tuthmosis III,

Minmose (I): Steward of the god’s wife. [Griffith Inst.]

Samut, overseer of works of Amun-Ra in Karnak, TT142; Son of Menta (Overseer of the granary of Amun) and Thutnefer. Wife: Sitamun.




Army Officials

Amenemhab called Mahu, Soldier of the Army, Deputy of the Army. Amenemhab was a favorite of Thutmosis III. He was married to a royal nurse named Baki, and went on to serve under Amenhotep II. He served as an officer of the navy and became the commander of a vessel. TT85
Amenemose, Captain of the troops under Thutmosis III and Amenhotep III. Buried in TT42.
Dedi, Head of the troops of Pharaoh, Governor of the deserts on the west of Thebes, Served Tuthmosis III and Amenhotep II; Wife: Tuy TT200
Djehuty, general. Known from grave goods (some items are in the museum in Leiden).
Horemheb, scribe of recruits, served Tuthmosis III - Amenhotep III (long service!) Tutor of Princess Amenmipet. Master of the Horse. Married to Atuia TT78
Pehsukher called Tjenenu, standard-bearer of Pharaoh, served under Tuthmosis III - Amenhotep II. Named Pehsukher, on a statue.  Bow-carrier of the Lord of the Two Lands (TT88) Wife: Neit (Chief Royal nurse, Governess of the god);  Sons: Amenhotep and Amenmose.
Thutiy
, General of the Army
Tjanuny
, Commander of the Soldiers, Chief of Recruits, scribe who recorded Thutmosis III’s military campaigns. Became Director of the Palace administration under Thutmosis IV. Buried in TT74



Bibliography / Recommended Reading
1. Breasted, J.H. Ancient Records of Egypt, Vol2, The eighteenth dynasty.
2. Cline and O'Connor (editors). Thutmose III : A New Biography, 2006
3. Dodson A. and Hilton D. The complete royal families of Ancient Egypt, 2004
4. Tyldesley, J., Hatchepsut, the Female Pharaoh.

















Comments: email barta@slu.edu